Geology, Star Wars, and the other good things

Ask me anything   'I Think When People Are Joking They Are Dead Serious, And When They Are Being Dead Serious Its Usually Pretty Funny' - Jim Morrison ♥

earthstory:

Crazy StromatoliteThis rock is an amazing, Precambrian aged fossil. The layered structures you see are stromatolites; the result of microscopic organisms producing alternating layers of sediment as they grow outward. The source of the colors isn’t completely clear from the description, but I think they relate to some of the other nearby rocks in Minnesota, where this was found. Other ancient rocks in this area are the source of Minnesota’s major iron formations, and iron is probably a source of both the greenish and reddish/orange colors in this rock.-JBBImage credit (Creative Commons):https://www.flickr.com/photos/tshearer/3935255529/

earthstory:

Crazy Stromatolite

This rock is an amazing, Precambrian aged fossil. The layered structures you see are stromatolites; the result of microscopic organisms producing alternating layers of sediment as they grow outward. 

The source of the colors isn’t completely clear from the description, but I think they relate to some of the other nearby rocks in Minnesota, where this was found. Other ancient rocks in this area are the source of Minnesota’s major iron formations, and iron is probably a source of both the greenish and reddish/orange colors in this rock.

-JBB

Image credit (Creative Commons):
https://www.flickr.com/photos/tshearer/3935255529/

— 1 week ago with 39 notes

staff:

Today’s the day. The day you help save the internet from being ruined.

Ready? 

Yes, you are, and we’re ready to help you.

(Long story short: The FCC is about to make a critical decision as to whether or not internet service providers have to treat all traffic equally. If they choose wrong, then the internet where anyone can start a website for any reason at all, the internet that’s been so momentous, funny, weird, and surprising—that internet could cease to exist. Here’s your chance to preserve a beautiful thing.)

— 1 week ago with 180475 notes
scinote:

The Kentland Impact Crater

The Kentland Impact Crater is found in Indiana near a town called— you guessed it— Kentland.  It is an active limestone and other aggregate quarry called Newton County Stone. This field trip was led by Dr. Nelson Shaffer of Purdue University who explained the geologic history of the site.  It’s one of the only exposed ancient crater sites in the region - but it doesn’t have much topographic relief because it’s around 97 million years old and has been through several glaciations which have “shaved off” the top.  It is a complex crater, meaning the impactor (meteorite) was big enough to cause the earth to rebound in the middle creating a central uplift.  The remains of the site can be clearly seen thanks to the active quarrying and many structural features - which are completely alien to geologically boring Indiana - can be seen in the walls, including sharp folding and beds tilted in every different direction.  In addition to the structural features, formations native to the region can be seen mushed together in the walls and included into other formations.  Namely, the Saint Peter Sandstone - the same sandstone that Chicago used for an aquifer until it got too big - can be seen in one of the above photos which reportedly has grains of coesite - the high-pressure cousin of quartz.  Other beds are composed of fossiliferous limestone and even glauconitic material, as well as shale, which was soft enough to basically turn into plastic cake frosting that squeezed into and through other formations.  All of these muddle together to form a massive structural headache, especially for a quarry team!  But they manage to make do and the quarry is apparently one of the better employment opportunities in the area.
If you aren’t familiar with AIPG (American Institute of Professional Geologists), you should definitely check them out, especially your regional section!  Student membership is free and, at least in the IL-IN section, field trips are free for students as well!  If you can’t get enough geology and being a kook by yourself in your backyard doesn’t satisfy your needs, consider AIPG.


Submitted by strike-the-dip
Edited by Yi Z.

scinote:

The Kentland Impact Crater

The Kentland Impact Crater is found in Indiana near a town called— you guessed it— Kentland.  It is an active limestone and other aggregate quarry called Newton County Stone. This field trip was led by Dr. Nelson Shaffer of Purdue University who explained the geologic history of the site.  It’s one of the only exposed ancient crater sites in the region - but it doesn’t have much topographic relief because it’s around 97 million years old and has been through several glaciations which have “shaved off” the top.  It is a complex crater, meaning the impactor (meteorite) was big enough to cause the earth to rebound in the middle creating a central uplift.  The remains of the site can be clearly seen thanks to the active quarrying and many structural features - which are completely alien to geologically boring Indiana - can be seen in the walls, including sharp folding and beds tilted in every different direction.  In addition to the structural features, formations native to the region can be seen mushed together in the walls and included into other formations.  Namely, the Saint Peter Sandstone - the same sandstone that Chicago used for an aquifer until it got too big - can be seen in one of the above photos which reportedly has grains of coesite - the high-pressure cousin of quartz.  Other beds are composed of fossiliferous limestone and even glauconitic material, as well as shale, which was soft enough to basically turn into plastic cake frosting that squeezed into and through other formations.  All of these muddle together to form a massive structural headache, especially for a quarry team!  But they manage to make do and the quarry is apparently one of the better employment opportunities in the area.

If you aren’t familiar with AIPG (American Institute of Professional Geologists), you should definitely check them out, especially your regional section!  Student membership is free and, at least in the IL-IN section, field trips are free for students as well!  If you can’t get enough geology and being a kook by yourself in your backyard doesn’t satisfy your needs, consider AIPG.

image

Submitted by strike-the-dip

Edited by Yi Z.

(via mindblowingscience)

— 1 week ago with 44 notes
brachiopod in thinsection♥

brachiopod in thinsection♥

— 2 weeks ago
#geology  #thinsection  #algae  #carbonates